The missionary adventures of the Stimpson family

The Gospel is the Power of God, Pt. 3 – Ransomed

Toshiba Exif JPEG

Way back here, I started a series on the different ways the Bible describes the work of the Gospel in our lives.  As Paul wrote in Romans 1:16, the Gospel is the “power of God” for our salvation.  It’s the power of God, something meant to turn whole nations upside-down!

The Gospel is God’s plan to restore and repair everything ruined by sin and the cruelty of man.  He has no Plan B, no alternative worked out in case the Gospel fails.  This is it.  This is His route to glorify His name, rescue His people, and rebuild His creation.

Here’s the next illustration I want to take a look at:

Ransomed

Jesus came to ransom us.  Mark 10:45 says, “For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”  What’s that mean?  To answer that, we gotta go back to the world Mark was writing in, a world shaped by the Old Testament.

In the Old Testament, the concept of ransoming something entails an exchange, paying a price for another’s release, much like the modern-day concept of paying a ransom to a kidnapper.

In the beginning of Israel’s history, God had laid claim to every firstborn male.  Like a 2-year-old around toys, God pointed at the firstborn men and said, “Mine.”  Every firstborn male, He said, belonged to Him and had to be sacrificed.

Since God isn’t a fan of lobster and doesn’t like human sacrifice, however, He allowed for certain firstborn males to be ransomed, exchanged, so they wouldn’t have to die as an offering.  Every firstborn human male was required to be ransomed.  In exchange for their lives, God took the Levites and 5 shekels (about $60) a head.  Firstborn men in Israel could go on living because God took the Levites’ service as exchange for their lives.

Similarly, firstborn male unclean animals (like lobster) were required to be ransomed, since offering something deemed unclean in sacrifice would be unthinkable.  Everyone who owned a firstborn male of an unclean animal was required to pay 5 shekels to ransom each one, so God wouldn’t have to accept your unclean sacrifice and you could go on running your lobster farm I guess.

Curiously, donkeys were also allowed to be ransomed, at the owner’s discretion.  A firstborn male donkey headed for sacrifice could be exchanged for a lamb if the owner wanted to make the substitution.  My guess is God gave this as a mercy to poor farmers who only had one family donkey that they really needed to survive.

Jesus ransomed us.  On the cross, He exchanged His life for ours.  We deserve the wrath of God, we deserve punishment, we deserve judgment in Hell for eternity, but Jesus took our place, receiving God’s wrath poured out on sin in our place, paying His own life as our ransom.  We were like a donkey headed for the temple to be sacrificed, when Jesus, our lamb, gave Himself in exchange, so we could go on living.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s