The missionary adventures of the Stimpson family

What 59 Cents Will Get You in Bucharest

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Picture above taken from Google StreetView.  The real photo would have a lot more snow around it this time of year.  🙂

 

Yesterday, I started posting about the calamity that occurred between Matei and Geta, two new believers who have been coming regularly to our Monday night meetings and growing a ton.  Thanks for everyone who has been praying.  We don’t know anything more about Matei, but Geta’s situation has improved, and family friends are taking care of the kids.  Keep praying, though, because the whole family still needs God to do a lot for them.

We hope to visit Matei in prison soon, but no one seems to know where he’s being held right now, but we were able to visit Geta yesterday at the hospital.

We were a humorous-looking troupe. Ben and I, already identical twins, happened to be both wearing hiking boots, blue jeans, black jackets, and black snow hats, carrying black Romanian Bibles.  Jason, with his dark beard, black coat, and gray backpack, looked like a cross between an Orthodox priest and a homeless guy.  And we were all three following Teresa and Rita, two short, round Gypsy women dressed in flowery dresses and “Christmas sweaters” as Jason described their outfits.  But we were going to see our sister, a member of our church family who had been attacked by the one closest to her.  She was hurting and scared and she needed us.

When we got to the hospital, Jason warned us, “They may not let all of us in.  Usually they’re pretty strict about only one or maybe two visitors being allowed in at the same time.”

“Let’s pray for favor then,” I suggested, and we all gathered together in front of the hospital to pray for a minute.

We walked into the hospital, went through one corridor after another, and eventually got to the security guard who made sure only one person was going in at a time.

Teresa explained the situation and asked if all of us could go in to pray for Geta, because she was desperately hurt and we were her church family, so she needed us.  “Well, I don’t know…” the guard hesitated.

So Teresa reached into her pocket and pulled out 2 lei and flashed it at him.  “OK, fine,” said the guard, grabbing the equivalent of 59 cents from her.  You can’t get much in Bucharest for 2 lei, so I don’t know what he was thinking.  Maybe he just decided to have pity on Teresa and let us pass, realizing that anyone who would offer you a 2 lei bribe was probably really desperate.

Rita looked at Ben, Jason, and I.  “Dumnezeu lucrează, frații,” she said with a smile.  Indeed, God is working.

We passed the security guard, walked down some more halls, and began the hike up the stairs.  One old man passed us and asked Teresa, “Where are you going?  Are you here for surgery?”

Finally, we found our way to where they were letting Geta rest and heal.  Before entering the large room filled with hospital beds, mostly empty, they handed us hospital gowns to put over our clothes.  When we tried to put our arms in the sleeves, the nurses corrected us, grabbed the gowns, and draped them around us like Jewish prayer shawls.  Now our humorous troupe was even more bizarre.

As we walked into the room, we felt like Medieval Orthodox priests with our robes hanging about our shoulders.

We found Geta and learned her situation had improved greatly over the previous day.  She could move a little, she could talk, and she seemed very awake and aware.  Doctors said she would be eating regular food soon and should be fine to leave after she has enough time to rest and recover.  She had lost 50% of her blood from the attack, but a blood transfusion was holding well and infections seemed to be held at bay.  She said her body hurt everywhere, but at least she was going to live.  Praise God.  He’s already been answering the prayers of a lot of people.

What broke our hearts the most, though, was to hear her blame herself for everything that had been done to her.  The first thing she said to us was, “I need to repent.  I have done something terrible.  I must have committed some great sin for this to happen to me.”  It was awful to hear her blaming herself for what her husband had done to her.

We told her she wasn’t the one to blame, that if she had sin in her life, God would never punish her by doing this, that he simply demands repentance, not torture.  We shared the Scriptures with her, encouraged her to believe for healing, prayed for her and commanded her body to be restored, and let her know that we and many others would be praying for her.

As we finished up, we told her that many Gypsies were praying for her, many churches in Bucharest, and that hundreds of people in America, friends of ours, would be praying for her because we would email them and tell them what had happened.  As we told her of the literally hundreds of people who would pray for her and her family, her eyes welled up with tears and she began to cry.

Suddenly, a doctor entered the room, scolded the nurses for letting all of us in at once, and told us we had to leave.

Just in time.

Please keep praying for Geta, Matei, and their kids.  We praise God for how He’s been healing Geta already, but we want to see God completely restore this family, robbing Satan from any and all glory that he hoped to achieve from this.  Romans 8:28 – “And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.”

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